Celiac disease and dairy proteins – summarization of articles

I want to address the issue of whether dairy could be an issue for those with celiac disease. I don’t think that I will be able to arrive at an exact answer with this post, but I do wish to summarize existing articles and evidence on this topic. From my personal experience, I get all the same symptoms from dairy products as from foods containing gluten. The symptoms include pains in the lower abdomen, bloating, constipation, fatigue, inflammation of the eyelids, as well as psychiatric symptoms including panic attacks, anxiety, and depression. Gathering anecdotal evidence by speaking to reddit users in the gluten-free subreddit, multiple individuals have also expressed the same experience with dairy causing similar symptoms to gluten. Also these individuals noticed that the same symptoms were caused by lactose-free products, therefore likely the culprit is not the sugar (lactose), but the proteins in dairy (casein). Below I will summarize several articles addressing the consumption of casein by individuals with celiac disease.

The first study that I found looking at the correlation between gluten and casein is from 2007, Mucosal reactivity to cow’s milk protein in coeliac disease. This article discusses the fact that some celiac patients on a gluten-free diet still experience gastrointestinal symptoms. The authors then examine whether these patients have an inflammatory immune response to the protein in cow’s milk. The results of this study indicated that in fact in a fraction of celiac patients did experience a similar reaction to the milk protein as to gluten. As usual, I used python to create article summaries, including this one.

Summary:
On clinical grounds cow’s milk (CM) protein sensitivity may be suspected. Here, using rectal protein challenge, we investigated the local inflammatory reaction to gluten and CM protein in adult patients with CD in remission.
In 18 of 20 patients gluten challenge induced neutrophil activation defined as increased MPO release and increased NO synthesis.
A mucosal inflammatory response similar to that elicited by gluten was produced by CM protein in about 50% of the patients with coeliac disease.

Summary using LexRank (graph-based method for computing relative importance of sentences):

Mean rectal ΔMPO was 303 ± 27 µg/l after casein challenge and 16 ± 27 µg/l after challenge with α-lactalbumin.
Compared to healthy controls, patients with CD showed significant increases in rectal NO and MPO concentrations measured 15 h after challenge with both CM and gluten (P < 0·001), while ECP was increased to a similar extent in the two groups ( ).
The major finding in this study is that rectal challenge with CM protein frequently induced a local inflammatory mucosal reaction in patients with CD but not in healthy controls.
Our patients with CD had normal serum levels of IgA, IgG and IgE against casein and α-lactalbumin, which might be explained by the fact that they were on a gluten-free diet and therefore had improved the mucosal integrity.
Our finding that, in a fraction of coeliac patients, CM protein challenge may induce an inflammatory reaction of the same magnitude, as did gluten challenge, may also suggest an innate as well as adaptive immune response to CM, and casein in particular.

There were several other studies on the topic of gluten-free and casein-diet, but they all investigated whether this diet would help patients on the autism spectrum, which is not the topic of my post. I did find another short article on gluten-free and casein-free diet helping with psychotic symptoms. Personally I have a similar experience, as consuming any gluten or dairy increases my paranoia, panic attacks, and intrusive thoughts. The authors claim that there is a following mechanism for psychosis:

“In autism and schizophrenia, incomplete digestion of certain proteins, gluten and casein, cause an autoimmune response as indicated by elevated levels of IgA and IgG antibodies. This intestinal malabsorption also causes pathogenic elements (peptide fractions), which bind to opioid receptors by crossing the blood-brain barrier. This releases exorphins (opiate-like substances, similar to certain drugs) that cause psychotic symptoms.”

Evidence-Based Practice: Introduction of a Gluten-Free and Casein-Free Diet to Alleviate Psychotic Symptoms
A case review of a young boy yielded an unexpected resolution of psychotic symptoms after the introduction of a gluten-free, casein-free (GFCF) diet.
The purpose of this paper is to show that health care professionals may use a gluten-free and casein-free diet (GFCF) as an additional element to standard treatment methods, to alleviate psychotic symptoms.
Additionally noted were similarities between autism and schizophrenia.
Introduction of a GFCF diet helps reduce psychotic symptoms, and gives another option for patients resistant to traditional treatment methods, especially adolescents and young adults.
Keywords: autism, gluten-free, casein-free diet (GFCF), psychosis, schizophrenia

My previous mistake when going on a dairy-free diet: too many food restrictions and not enough calcium

I want to describe my mistakes with my previous attempt at going dairy-free. A bit of background – I started experiencing severe abdominal cramps in my 20s, then also I started to have panic attacks, fatigue, and swollen eyelids. I had problems waking up in the morning. I ended up being referred to a psychiatrist, but the medications did not help. Finally an endocrinologist checked my antibodies and found that I had very high levels of thyroid antibodies, so my immune system was attacking and damaging my thyroid. I was put on thyroid medication. I also was referred to a neurologist who then diagnosed me with autoimmune encephalitis (brain inflammation), and I was treated with intravenous steroids (for immunosuppression). At the same time I started reading online a lot about autoimmune diseases and I came across articles about the AIP diet. I was feeling to unwell, so I decided that I had to change my lifestyle, and I started following the AIP diet strictly – no dairy, no gluten, no soy, no grains, no legumes, no nuts, no chocolate, no alcohol. There were a lot of restrictions! You can google this diet, if you are curious.

After the corticosteroid treatment and the diet change, I did start feeling better, I l also lost 20kg, but I still experienced a lot of symptoms such as irritability, leg spasms, feeling of numbness in my fingers, and insomnia. I ended up deciding that there was no scientific evidence for my dietary restrictions, and at some point I went back to eating dairy and gluten, as well as the rest of the foods. I ended up gaining 30kg, and starting to again experiencing paranoia, panic attacks, nightmares, and fatigue.

I recently decided to look into my diet again and instead of going into the extremes – such as the very strict AIP diet, I started with excluding dairy. I also realized that when I was dairy-free the first time, I did not consume any foods with calcium, and that could have been the cause of my muscle cramps and numbness in my hands. This time I looked into non-dairy sources of calcium and calculated how much of those foods I would need to be eating. I have now been dairy free since February, I also went gluten-free and soy-free, as I noticed through multiple observations, that those foods were also causing symptoms for me. I now no longer have any pains in the lower abdomen, I have more energy and was able to attend yoga classes. I have no symptoms of low calcium this time, as I eat canned sardines, canned salmon with bones, and powdered egg shells. I am feeling much better, and I have lost around 22 pounds since February.

Simple gluten-free and dairy free breakfast

I have decided to go not only dairy-free, which I have been doing for a while, but also gluten-free again. This has led me to re-planning my meals. When I previously followed a dairy-free and gluten-free diet during 2016-2018, I was able to loose a lot of weight. I can’t be certain that it was specifically the avoidance of gluten and dairy, as I was also taking Cytomel (a synthetic version of the T3 thyroid hormone), and Cytomel is known to possible lead to significant weight loss. I started eating gluten again three years ago, as I was not convinced that there is such a condition as gluten intolerance (without having celiac disease). I am still not convinced that I have gluten intolerance, but being currently quite overweight, and not being able to lose the extra weight, I decided to try the gluten-free diet again. I don’t think that I will miss out on any vitamins by giving up gluten, as my diet is varied enough in order to obtain all the essentials. In any case, I can always return to eating gluten if I will not observe any effects of a gluten-free diet on my weight.

I have been already eating healthy, in my opinion, but now my meals required some re-planning. It’s no longer possible to eat a rye toast with hummus in the morning, or a smoked salmon whole-wheat sandwich for lunch. I also don’t really enjoy cooking and would like this process to be as simple as possible. In the morning I have a small gap of time between the time that the nanny arrives and the time at which I have to start work. Therefore, breakfast preparation has to be especially quick. Below is my idea for a breakfast meal that requires very little cooking or waiting. It also does not contain any refined carbohydrates.

Meal: boiled eggs, a gluten-free tortilla with hummus, oatmeal with coconut milk and berries

Main protein: one or two boiled eggs (depending on how hungry you are)
Start cooking the eggs as the first step, as other items will take a shorter time to prepare.
One egg contains about 7 grams of protein and 1.6 grams of saturated fat, eggs do no contain carbohydrates. One egg has about 0.6 micrograms of B12, which is 25% of the daily value. Therefore by eating two eggs in the morning, I can obtain 50% of my DV of B12! Eggs also contain folate, riboflavin, iodine, and selenium.

Additional protein: hummus with a gluten-free tortilla or toast
Hummus is made out of chickpeas and tahini, chickpeas are relatively high in protein and folate, also B6 and magnesium. I used sweet potato tortillas, which were OK, but any other gluten-free tortillas or bread would do:
https://www.bfreefoods.com/us/products/sweet-potato-wraps/

Starch / carbohydrates: quick steel cut oats
I stumbled upon these oats on Amazon and I found this product pretty useful. The oats can be prepared in a microwave in 2.5 minutes. I mix them with coconut milk power before microwaving.
https://www.amazon.ca/Post-Original-Instant-Oatmeal-Flaxseeds/dp/B08X8HLXSP

Oats are known to contain beta-glucan soluble fiber, which contributes to gut health. Beta-glucan fiber may also prevent sharp increases in blood sugar after meals. Oats are also a source of thiamine, magnesium, zinc, and phosphorous.

Fat: coconut milk powder
Coconut milk contains a type of fat called medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs). MCTs could potentially aid in weight loss and increase insulin sensitivity. Also it is creamy! And since this breakfast idea is dairy free, coconut milk is what makes the oatmeal taste better.

Additional items: add any berries, nuts, dark chocolate chips to your oatmeal
I added strawberries. Strawberries contain high amount of vitamin C and also contain folate and manganese.
Still hungry? Slowly eat a whole celery stick. It is low in calories but can help you feel full. It’s difficult to eat celery quickly, and eating slowly can help pass the time, until your brain finally signals that you are satiated.

Drink: tea or coffee
I do not drink any juices, as most juices have a very high glycemic index.


Any benefits to ‘ancient’ grains?

Ancient grains are whole grains that are considered more… ancient… than some modern grains. If you ever visit health stores, than you probably had seen this marketing label multiple times – Ancient Grains Pasta! Ancient Grains Cereal! Ancient Grains Bread. Also now I see everywhere sprouted breads, sprouted cereals, sprouted oatmeal. There is even a brand that sells Ezekiel 4:9 bread with a verse from the Holy Scripture on the package. I suppose they were trying to emphasize how ancient the recipe is. Or holy.

In general I think dietitians would say that whole ancient grain breads, wraps, cereals, pastries, etc., are definitely healthier than same items made out of white flour. I also think they are healthier than similar gluten-free items. In those the main ingredient is usually tapioca starch or white rice flour. Take for example Glutino sandwich bread. I just Googled it and right away saw this description of their product by the company: “Did you know? Gluten comes from the Latin word for “glue”. So think of yourself as eating glue-free.” Yes, because the word gluten originates from some Latin word meaning ‘glue’, you should drop everything and switch to eating slices of white matter made out of modified tapioca starch, corn starch, potato starch, and baking soda. One slice of the Glutino bread contains 0g fiber, 0g protein, and I don’t see any other nutrients listed on the label.

In this conversation  I will not refer to people who have celiac disease. I understand that with celiac even one crumb of gluten would cause an autoimmune reaction. I’m referring here to all of us who did not test positive for celiac disease, but were told by naturopaths and other pseudo ‘doctors’ that gluten is causing their autoimmune disease, or thyroid disease, or depression, anxiety, autism, you name it. I don’t see any convincing evidence that whole grain gluten grains cause any of these diseases. To provide good evidence, I think a study would have to follow two randomized groups of patients for a while and restrict the diet of the test group to be gluten-free, group assignment of course would have to be unknown to the patients. The diets would have to be the same in other aspects, otherwise it’s not a fair comparison. Also the diet should be healthy , so the patients are receiving all the necessary nutrients, since we are interested in whether or not gluten has negative effects on health with an otherwise healthy diet. You would also have to do separate studies for each condition. Randomized test-control study for patients with schizophrenia, with depression, with autism, hypothyroidism, etc. If gluten negatively affects schizophrenia symptoms, it does not necessarily mean that  it also negatively effects patients with thyroid disease. For example high soy consumption is not recommended for those taking levothyroxine as it may interfere with medication absorption. On the other hand some research suggests that soy has antidepressant effects and therefore could help individuals with depression.

Is there some research in regards to gluten and neuropsychiatric and autoimmune diseases (except celiac)? Yes, there is. I just really don’t like the claims by naturopaths on their websites that it’s known that gluten causes schizophrenia, depression, and everything else. We definitely can’t claim causation, we don’t have such information at this point, and it doesn’t make sense to bundle up a dozen of diseases together. Schizophrenia is very different from hypothyroidism, and both are different from ADHD.

For schizophrenia: there is some renewed interest in regards to gluten-free diet. “Going gluten free shows a benefit for a subset of schizophrenia patients,… Those on the gluten-free diet also showed improvement in gastrointestinal symptoms and improvement in certain cognitive traits, such as attention and verbal learning.”

Interest renewed in targeting gluten in schizophrenia

Autism: The one review of research that I found indicated that evidence was inconclusive. “Studies evaluating gluten/casein-free diets reported some parent-rated improvements in communication and challenging behaviors; however, data were inadequate to make conclusions about the body of evidence (insufficient SOE). Studies of gluten- or casein-containing challenge foods reported no effects on behavior or gastrointestinal symptoms with challenge foods (insufficient SOE);”

Nutritional and Dietary Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review

Hypothyroidism: I could not find an actual systematic review on relationship between hypothyroidism and gluten research, therefore I am not sure if there is any evidence that gluten consumption negatively impact thyroid function. Clinical websites state that there is no such evidence. “Generally, there’s no hypothyroidism diet. Although claims about hypothyroidism diets abound, there’s no evidence that eating or avoiding certain foods will improve thyroid function in people with hypothyroidism.”

Hypothyroidism diet

Personally I did not achieve remission in depression or autoimmune disease with a gluten-free diet. In fact at first going gluten-free probably led to a worse diet for me, as I would eat two or three gluten-free bread cheese sandwiches a day, and as we can see this type of bread has no proteins, nor fiber, no other nutrients. So basically I was eating tapioca starch. I was also consuming gluten-free cookies, which are probably mostly sugar and again, tapioca starch, corn tortilla chips, and gluten-free subs (gluten-free Subway buns are a lot of cornstarch). I doubt there are any B vitamins in the above foods, nor any other nutrients. What about a healthy diet with gluten-free grains vs. the same diet, but also including gluten whole grains? It has been over a month for me since I started eating gluten again. I have not noticed so far any changes in my health. My health did not improve nor did it worsen. I don’t want to limit myself and keep falling victim to these restrictive diets promising to cure all your mental health problems. Gluten-free diet, alkaline diet, keto diet, AIP diet.. there will be claims found for each of these that this specific diet cures depression, autism, and schizophrenia. Well I have not found a cure for depression, so I do not have that answer. It’s important to eat healthy, but it doesn’t seem to me that a very restrictive diet is an answer.

Again, for myself I did not observe worsening of mental issues after introducing gluten whole grains to my diet. Also not obsessing over whether something was contaminated with gluten lessened my anxiety related to eating. I am still trying to avoid A1 cow dairy and yeast (based on my testing of my symptoms). I want to restrict as few foods as possible. Naturopaths telling people that a bite of gluten or a piece of corn will cause panic attacks for the next few months are the ones actually contributing to anxiety of people like me. By starting eating gluten again I made my life much easier – I don’t have to pay extra for gluten-free oats, I buy rotis, wraps, and samosas, which I can easily eat at work in the morning or as a snack. I’m eating cereal and getting the B vitamins. I can purchase good tasting spelt pasta for cheap, instead of buying very expensive chickpea pasta.

In regards to whole wheat vs. more ancient wheat related grains, I don’t think there is strong evidence that ancient grains are better, but there are some studies related to this. I buy and mix both types of flour – spelt and whole wheat. I noticed that using only spelt flour, the muffins or cookies don’t rise as well (even though I do add sodium bicarbonate or potassium bicarbonate).

There is some evidence in support of ancient grains consumption, I will review it below.

Grain composition is affected by both the environment and agronomy, particularly the type and amount of nitrogen fertilisation. Increased nitrogen application leads to higher protein content (Shewry et al., 2013), but this is accompanied by effects on protein composition, with high protein grain containing higher proportions of gluten storage proteins and of gliadin proteins within this fraction (Godfrey et al., 2010).

 compared data for ancient wheats with modern durum and bread wheats. However, to minimise effects of the environment they only considered studies in which modern and ancient wheats were grown together in field experiments. They concluded that ancient wheats differ little from modern wheat species in their contents of most bioactive components and may be lower in some components such as dietary fibre. However, there is clear agreement in the literature that einkorn, emmer and Khorasan (Kamut) wheat all have higher high contents of the carotenoid lutein than bread wheat, which is selected for white colour. Modern durum wheat is also rich in lutein due to selection for yellow colour.

Six trials reported comparisons of Kamut or related forms of Khorasan wheat with modern durum and/or bread wheats, measuring effects on parameters related to cardiovascular disease, glycaemic index, type 2 diabetes and irritable bowel syndrome. However, none of these studies compared Kamut wheat grown in identical conditions to the control wheats, presumably because the growth of Kamut is strictly controlled. As stated on the Kamut® web site (http://www.kamut.com/en/discover/the-trademark): “The KAMUT® trademark is a guarantee that the khorasan wheat bearing it is always the original, unmodified, unhybridized and non-GMO variety. KAMUT® khorasan wheat is also always grown certified organic and meets high purity, nutrition and quality standards”.

Scazzina et al (2008) obtained wholemeal Kamut and bread wheat flours from a local (Italian) supermarket and hence nothing is known about the growth conditions of the crops or the identity of the control wheat (although it would be expected to be a blend of commercial cultivars). Tortillas prepared with 60% flour had significantly higher fibre (6.7% compared with 3.5%) and lower starch (44.3% compared with 48.6%) when made from Kamut than from bread wheat, but did not differ in glycaemic index in an intervention trial.

Pasta made from the semi-whole wheat semolina fractions of Kamut and durum wheat and bread and crackers made from the semi-whole wheat flours from Kamut and bread wheats were compared in a randomised single blinded cross-over trial with 22 patients. The Kamut diet resulted in significant reductions in metabolic risk factors (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, blood glucose), improved redox status, increased serum potassium and magnesium and significant reductions in circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

Do ancient types of wheat have health benefits compared with modern bread wheat?

Gluten, scary titles, and science

Last Friday during lunch I bought some spelt crackers and ate them, and nothing happened. Spelt is a type of grain that is strongly related to wheat. Why did I decide to try it? Well I have been trying to eat gluten-free since May 2016 when I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (and later on with Hashimoto’s encephalitis). I had been seeing a psychiatrist since October 2015 but I wasn’t responding to any of the prescribed psych meds, so my mom ordered the family doctor to refer me for autoimmune testing and high levels of anti-Tg and anti-TPO antibodies were found. I also tested positive for deamidated gliadin IgG, but negative for transglutaminase IgA antibodies. Total IgA was within normal range. Clinical websites state that if total IgA is normal and tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-IgA is negative, there is a low probability of the patient having celiac disease and a biopsy may not be necessary. My doctor did order a biopsy because of the elevated deamidated gliadin antibodies and the results indicated that there were no atrophic features identified (celiac disease causes persistent villous atrophy).

So what happened next? I think a rational doctor at this point should have said that I could go on with my bread eating, since the biopsy is the main test for celiac disease detection, and my results came back normal. But psychiatrically I was not well and my mom was very scared, she didn’t know what to do, since the psychiatrist was also out of ideas. When conventional medicine fails, people turn to alternative. Soon here we were, with my mom at a naturopath’s office. Consultation price per hour was around $250. The man in a white coat, pretending to be a doctor, asked me about my symptoms. He stated that I had to stop consuming gluten, dairy, needed to do a food sensitivities test, hair analysis test, should stop taking my antidepressant medication, and should buy $100 worth of supplements from him. He also mentioned eating cooked kale. In total this one consultation, after my mom also paid for all the tests he ordered, cost my mom around $2000 – $2500. That’s how you make money, ladies and gentlemen.

It’s very easy to come across articles online with scary titles about gluten. “Is Gluten Causing Your Depression?”, “The Surprising Link Between Gluten and Depression”, “Is gluten messing with your mind? Find out how.” One articles states that it could be actually FODMAPs (fermentable oligo di mono-saccharides and polyols) causing bowel inflammation and in turn depression. Wheat is high in FODMAPs and it’s effects could be misinterpreted as caused by gluten. This theory has some research to support it. Personally since I started eating gluten already a month ago, I did not experience abdominal pain from wheat products. I did notice bloating and pain after eating yeast containing products, such as bread, but no problem with eating wheat rotis, flatbread, etc. I am also using helminthic therapy, as I mentioned in previous posts, so this also could have helped with abdominal inflammation.

Some other articles outright claim that gluten causes “hundreds of symptoms”, also causing depression, psychosis, schizophrenia, and autism. To make extraordinary claims you have to provide extraordinary evidence. I have not been able to find strong evidence that gluten consumption causes any of the above conditions. There do exist several studies finding negative symptoms from gluten consumption, but I would not call this strong evidence. There are also other studies indicating negative impact of a gluten-free diet. I will list some of the studies below, covering both sides of the argument:

  1. Mood Disorders and Gluten: It’s Not All in Your Mind! A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis. Meta-analyses with random-effects were performed. Three randomised-controlled trials and 10 longitudinal studies comprising 1139 participants fit the inclusion criteria. A gluten-free diet (GFD) significantly improved pooled depressive symptom scores in GFD-treated patients (Standardised Mean Difference (SMD) −0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.55 to −0.20; p < 0.0001), with no difference in mean scores between patients and healthy controls after one year (SMD 0.01, 95% CI −0.18 to 0.20, p = 0.94). There was a tendency towards worsening symptoms for non-coeliac gluten sensitive patients during a blinded gluten challenge vs. placebo (SMD 0.21, 95% CI −0.58 to 0.15; p = 0.25). Our review supports the association between mood disorders and gluten intake in susceptible individuals. The effects of a GFD on mood in subjects without gluten-related disorders should be considered in future research.
  2. Effects of a gluten-free diet on gut microbiota and immune function in healthy adult humans. The trial included 10 healthy subjects (30.3 years-old), which were submitted to a GFD over one month. Analysis of fecal microbiota and dietary intake indicated that numbers of healthy gut bacteria decreased, while numbers of unhealthy bacteria increased parallel to reductions in the intake of polysaccharides after following the GFD. Fecal samples of subjects under a GFD, which represent an altered microbiota, also exerted lower immune stimulatory effects on peripheral blood mononuclear cells than those of subjects on a regular gluten-containing diet.
  3. The Gluten-Free Diet: Fad or Necessity?

    Some evidence indicates that there are significant drawbacks to following the gluten-free diet. For example, gluten-free processed grain products (e.g., breads, cereals, and crackers) are often lower in fiber, iron, zinc, and potassium (29). The gluten-free diet also may increase the risks for nutritional deficiencies, especially in B vitamins, iron, and trace minerals (30). In addition, gluten-free products continue to be significantly more expensive. A 2015 study found that gluten-free bread and bakery products were on average 267% more expensive than gluten-containing breads, and gluten-free cereals were found to be 205% more expensive than gluten-containing cereals (29).

    Individuals following the gluten-free diet also may fail to adhere to recommendations regarding daily servings of grain products. One study found that 38% of patients with celiac disease included no grain or starch choice at meals; when patients did choose a grain product, 44% most frequently chose rice (31). In another survey of people with celiac disease, 80% were eating less than half of the recommended daily amount of grains, and only 1.1% ate the six recommended servings each day. Of those who did eat grain products, 61% most frequently chose rice and corn (32).

Personally I don’t see any strong evidence that a gluten-free diet would reduce depressive symptoms in persons with no celiac disease. In the first study, the authors state “anti-gliadin IgG antibodies disappeared in NCGS patients [34] and markers of systemic inflammation were reduced in IBS patients [36], as well as healthy mice [37] following initiation of a GFD.” I don’t see this applicable to me because I tested and I do not experience any IBS symptoms from consuming wheat or spelt. I do find myself having strong abdominal pain after consumption of regular cow milk products or yeast containing products, such as leavened bread. I have no problem with muffins prepared with baking soda, rotis, tortillas, or breakfast cereals. I see no reason to not eat these foods as they are healthy whole grains and contain B vitamins. In general I don’t want to have specific constrains for myself and feel guilty after eating once piece of pie. I know some naturopaths will say that even one piece of a cookie with gluten can make you depressed, but I see that as non-scientific nonsense. I have been gluten free, dairy free, on the autoimmune protocol diet, and I am still depressed. Depression can be caused by genetics, female hormones (such as premenstrual dysphoric disorder), epigenetics. One piece of pie isn’t going to make it or break it for me, but it does make that moment sweeter. I’m not going to be eating pie often and I do limit my sugar intake, but once a week at a friend’s house is no big deal.

By law, in Canada white wheat flour has to be enriched, therefore by eating flour products you obtain several B vitamins.  “The mandatory enrichment of white flour with B vitamins, iron and folic acid is a cornerstone of Canada’s fortification program aimed at helping to prevent nutrient deficiencies and maintain or improve the nutritional quality of the food supply.

Section B.13.001 (Food and Drug Regulations):

[S] Flour, White Flour, Enriched Flour or Enriched White Flour

(d)shall contain in 100 grams of flour

  1. 0.64 milligrams of thiamine
  2. 0.40 milligrams of riboflavin
  3. 5.30 milligrams of niacin or niacinamide
  4. 0.15 milligrams of folic acid, and
  5. 4.4 milligrams of iron

(e) may contain

(xv) in 100 grams of flour

  1. 0.31 milligrams of vitamin B6
  2. 1.3 milligrams of d-pantothenic acid, and
  3. 190 milligrams of magnesium

(f) may contain calcium carbonate, edible bone meal, chalk (B.P.), ground limestone or calcium sulphate in an amount that will provide in 100 grams of flour 140 milligrams of calcium.

All white flour and foods containing white flour that are sold or intended for sale in Canada, both imported and domestically produced, are expected to be in compliance with the enrichment requirements for white flour.

White flour is processed and has high glycemic index, so it’s not advised to eat it often, but I am no longer trying to completely avoid it. Whole grain gluten flours such as whole wheat, splet, and kamut, also contain B vitamins. I am also glad to eat fortified cereal again, as they are cheap, convenient, and in one bowl you get a lot of B vitamins, plus magnesium, zinc, and iron. For example, I bought a giant box of bran flakes for $5 at Drug Mart and only 3/4 of a cup contains 30% DV iron, 45% DV thiamine, 10% DV B6, 8% DV folate, 10% DV zinc. It’s pretty hard to get that nutrition from consuming gluten-free corn cereal or puffed rice. Also it tastes better, so why not eat it? Unless someone provides strong and clear scientific evidence to do otherwise.